let’s compare some ‘sandy’ sables

(the little coffee cup is 2″ tall)


What is a sable?

My CIA notebook has a recipe for Pecan Sables as follows:
cake flour
no egg
3 parts butter
1 part sugar
1 part cream
1.2 parts flour
refrigerate, slice and bake 
(these were very good)
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Baking and Pastry from CIA has a recipe for Sand Cookies:
all purpose flour
no egg
2.7 parts butter
1 part powdered sugar
3.8 parts flour
refrigerate, slice and bake
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Viking “Around the World Cookie Swap” lists French Sables Korova:
all purpose flour
no egg
chocolate
.8 part flour
1 part butter
1 part sugar
refrigerate, slice and bake
(I remember these cookies melting/dissolving in my mouth upon the first bite.)
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Joy of Baking lists sable ingredients as:
all purpose flour
1 parts butter
.7 part sugar
1 egg
2 parts flour
refrigerate, slice and bake
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Then there is the recipe I followed:
bread flour
1 part butter
.4 part powdered sugar
.2 part egg white
1.1 part flour
pipe with large star tip and bake
I chose this recipe ( ”Butter cookies-sables a la poche-sand in your pocket” found at Baked By Me) because the pictures of the sables on the I Bake What I Like blog were beautiful and quite inspiring.  I didn’t compare ingredient parts (I’ve been reading “Ratio” by Michael Ruhlman and now I’m converting everything to …parts!) ;  I just assumed a sable was a sable.  Bread flour is used in this recipe to help the cookies hold their shape when piped with a large star tip.  The cookies did pipe beautifully, and held their shape after baking.  But, the cookies did not dissolve in my mouth as other sables have.  And, the next time I bake these, I would add much more vanilla, or another flavoring. 

As I said, I baked these because they were – pretty.  I have lemon curd in the freezer.  These cookies would be quite tasty sandwiched together with lemon curd. 
(the mini cupcake holder is about 2″ wide)

I still don’t know what a sable should be…but these cookies are so cute!

never underestimate Self Rising Flour



Today, Sweet and Simple bakers are posting their Lemon Curd Muffins.  I’ve joined this group and look forward to future baking delights.

I read the recipe; the ingredient list was so simple, I (very prematurely) decided these muffins would be nothing out of the ordinary, especially made with self rising flour.  After all, ‘real’ bakers bake with all-purpose flour…don’t they?

I have read lemon curd recipes for several months; this baking challenge encouraged me to attempt the lemon curd.  It was so easy and so very delicious.  Here’s my blog link detailing the steps in making lemon curd.  I wanted to eat the lemon curd out of the bowl, but knew I had to reserve enough to make the lemon curd muffins, which was the original purpose, wasn’t it?

I mixed the muffin batter, making a few adjustments based on the ingredients in my pantry.  Caster sugar I interpreted as very fine sugar, so I put my granulated sugar through the food processor – it smoked – or made sugar dust.

I used extra large eggs, corn oil, heavy whipping cream, and I doubled the vanilla.

These lemon curd muffins passed my appearance and taste test with flying colors.  I took them to work, for the real test.  These tart, simple little muffins received unbelievable praise at work.  I believe the word I kept hearing was ‘awesome!!’

Rather than melting the lemon curd to spread on the top of the muffins, I simply smeared on a dollop of the curd while the muffins were hot.  It melted slightly, yet held its shape on top of the muffins.  I then sprinkled the muffin tops with decorative sugar to add a little eye appeal.

What a great recipe to have in my files.  Thank you, Sweet and Simple Bakes, for sharing this one!

Here’s the link to the recipe:  Lemon Curd Muffins