chocolate granola featuring Olive and Sinclair chocolate

This is my dessert granola.  I feel healthier eating oats and almonds with my chocolate.  
Seriously, this granola, baked from a recipe adapted from Orangette, is flavorful and filling.  You can find her original recipe here.

Here’s my adaptation of Molly’s recipe.

Chocolate Granola

preheat oven to 300 degrees

Mix:
3 c oats
1/2 c of KY Kernel pecans and-or almonds (or nuts of your choice)
4 T milled flax
pinch of salt
1/4 c cacao nibs

In a small saucepan, warm:
6 T honey
2 T coconut oil
1 t espresso powder

Pour the warm liquid over the oat mixture; stir well.
Bake on parchment lined baking sheet 10 minutes; stir well and bake 10 more minutes.

Turn oven off
Leave granola in oven for 10 more minutes (total time 30 minutes).

Remove pan from oven.

Add:

1/2 c dried currents
Allow to cool completely.
Store in tightly sealed container in freezer.

frangipane – blueberry version



I have probably grossly misused the word for the divine, almond pastry cream like mixture, frangipane. However, the almond flavor in frangipane is so intense, and I’m looking for a blueberry flavor just as intense.  Perhaps the oil in the almonds add to the intensity; that oil quality may not occur in blueberries.


Listed below are a couple of internet references related to frangipane.


from O Chef:
What is Frangipane?

 I have a cookbook that was written some time ago. In it there is a recipe for frangipan. The recipe resembles pastry cream. It mentions nothing about almond paste. Did frangipan always have almond paste in it?
 It is interesting how food and cooking terms can evolve over a few hundred years. The earliest reference we can find to frangipane dates from about the mid 1600s, and was applied to a custard tart that included both ground almonds and pistachios in the custard. Since then, it is most often used to refer to an almond-flavored pastry cream, but, like you, we have found a reference to a vanilla-flavored pastry cream without almonds also called frangipane. We have found a pastry shell itself that goes by the name, which may be stuffed with a savory filling rather than sweet. Finally, it can be a gooey, savory paste, used to stuff meats or fish before cooking.
Given all those choices, we vote for the almond-flavored pastry cream, and intend never to use the word for anything else! Nowadays, it is mostly spelled frangipane or frangipani.

Actually, frangipane can be any cream or custard-like substance with nuts.


I’m looking for a blueberry granola recipe with blueberry flavor as intense as that in my almond (frangipane) granola. Thus, an experiment is outlined before you.


Blueberry powder

Blueberry paste – this has the consistency of just made marshmallows

made from these dried blueberries (Simply the Best from Pike Place Market in Seattle, WA)
Photograph here should be of the frangipane-blueberry version; I’ll insert later.
Frangipane-blueberry version mixed with honey, and ready to pour over granola mixture.
Blueberry granola, 30 minutes out of the oven.  The blueberry flavor in this granola is not as intense as the almond flavor in my almond frangipane granola.  I’ve stored the granola in the freezer for a couple of weeks, to age.  

If the experiment is a success, I’ll update this post with the recipe.

granola with cranberries for the holidays

A much needed break from the pounds of butter and sugar incorporated into the holiday baking, this granola provides flavor, nutrition, and crunch.

I baked mine a few minutes longer than specified in the recipe, and that was a mistake.  Once the granola cooled, it became quite crunchy.

The candied ginger adds a nice flavor boost, but half the amount listed in the recipe would be adequate.  Notice the tiny pecans.  They can be purchased on line at http://www.kykernelpecans.com, from orchards in Hickman, KY, near my home.  The flavor of these small pecans is far superior to that of the larger pecans.  These pecans remind me of the pecans Mom would spend hours cracking and storing.

enjoy!

Recipe can be found here.