1-2-3 essence from "Ratio" page 38



A cookbook with math formulas!  What more could an accountant / baker want?

I have to admit, the first time I baked the 1-2-3 Cookie Dough, I used white wheat flour, added orange oil, and threw in chopped Ghirardelli 100% cacao unsweetened chocolate.  I should have added more sugar!  The mixture was very crumbly.  Lesson learned:  ”If it’s crumbly going in, it will probably be crumbley coming out.”  The cookies were bad..just bad.  But, the fault was not that of Mr. Ruhlman’s ratio in his latest book, “Ratio The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking.”  
For my second attempt with the ratio, I followed the directions (almost) exactly as the author suggested.  My only deviation was the addition of the seeds from one vanilla bean (don’t! throw that bean away; bury it in a jar of granulated sugar).  The dark, tiny flecks throughout the shortbread cookies added to their charm and simplicity, and taste.  I could have dressed the cookies with drizzles of chocolate, but I let them stand on their own.  They were delicious.  They were not crumbly.  They cut beautifully.  Like the author says, “…you can understand what a cookie is.”
I like to bake shortbread in my 14″ x 4″ tart pan.  It’s easy to remove the cookie, and its easy to cut even slices.

Add this percentage to your book, Mr. Ruhlman –  The cookies get a 100% rating!  I just need more room in the margin for notes!

my new favorite number

#45802

Finally!!!!  My first TasteSpotting post!!!  Whooo  Hoooo!

My first two submissions did not make the cut, but my third submission was chosen to be posted on TasteSpotting!  
This is one of my favorite web sites.  I admire the beautiful photography and I plan to bake everything I see (which is not possible).   This web site is also a great link to bakers all over the world.
This is quoted from the “About” section of the TasteSpotting web site:

“Founded on the idea that we eat first with our eyes, TasteSpotting is our obsessive, compulsive collection of eye-catching images that link to something deliciously interesting on the other side. Think of TasteSpotting as a highly visual potluck of recipes, references, experiences, stories, articles, products, and anything else that inspires exquisite taste.

We don’t use the term “potluck” for the hell of it. Everyone brings something to the party here: the user community submits images/links from around the web and the editorial team reviews the submissions. What finally gets served up on the site is a beautifully refined set of the community’s contributions.

The site was launched in January 2007 and is run by Sarah of The Delicious Life and a small group who just likes to be called “The Team.” “

Here’s the link to TasteSpotting.  Do take a moment and find #45802!

never underestimate Self Rising Flour



Today, Sweet and Simple bakers are posting their Lemon Curd Muffins.  I’ve joined this group and look forward to future baking delights.

I read the recipe; the ingredient list was so simple, I (very prematurely) decided these muffins would be nothing out of the ordinary, especially made with self rising flour.  After all, ‘real’ bakers bake with all-purpose flour…don’t they?

I have read lemon curd recipes for several months; this baking challenge encouraged me to attempt the lemon curd.  It was so easy and so very delicious.  Here’s my blog link detailing the steps in making lemon curd.  I wanted to eat the lemon curd out of the bowl, but knew I had to reserve enough to make the lemon curd muffins, which was the original purpose, wasn’t it?

I mixed the muffin batter, making a few adjustments based on the ingredients in my pantry.  Caster sugar I interpreted as very fine sugar, so I put my granulated sugar through the food processor – it smoked – or made sugar dust.

I used extra large eggs, corn oil, heavy whipping cream, and I doubled the vanilla.

These lemon curd muffins passed my appearance and taste test with flying colors.  I took them to work, for the real test.  These tart, simple little muffins received unbelievable praise at work.  I believe the word I kept hearing was ‘awesome!!’

Rather than melting the lemon curd to spread on the top of the muffins, I simply smeared on a dollop of the curd while the muffins were hot.  It melted slightly, yet held its shape on top of the muffins.  I then sprinkled the muffin tops with decorative sugar to add a little eye appeal.

What a great recipe to have in my files.  Thank you, Sweet and Simple Bakes, for sharing this one!

Here’s the link to the recipe:  Lemon Curd Muffins